An Angry Rant About Religious Extremism and Those Who Condone Acts of Hateful Violence

If you are someone who’s easily offended when religion is criticized, please keep scrolling. I don’t need to hear religious apologists at this point. I’m so riled about these attacks against innocent people that I’ve decided to remove my usually firmly placed filter. If you plan to comment with non-productive insults, save your breath because I will delete it. I don’t have the time or the patience for people who cannot bear to see their god criticized. It’s probably best to just delete me if you cannot have a civil conversation about it. I won’t miss you. This is my way of getting things “off my chest” and there’s nothing I love more than open and honest dialogue. Please feel free to leave a comment with your thoughts.

Religious extremism + easy access to weapons = death. It’s that simple. Terror can come from anywhere – radicalists born in North America are just as dangerous as people from anywhere else when they’re convinced religious ideals need to be enforced with violence. 

The concept inspired by Hitchens is one I think should be followed. Religion should be treated like childrens’ toys – play with them at home with people who also want to play with the toys. Dont tell anyone else they have to play with the toys, don’t force the toys into government or schools, and most of all don’t use your toys to cause misery, death, and destruction. I’m not saying people don’t have the right to believe whatever they choose, I’m saying that once it starts to negatively impact other people’s lives, then you’ve taken it too far.

To say religion is the compass for morality is a joke. It takes ten seconds to come up with quotes from any holy book that promote violence, hate, fear, oppression, and death. We need to rid ourselves of these archaic and destructive “morals” before more innocent people die. 

While on the surface there are some good things that religion preaches, this doesn’t excuse the many terrible things it tells people they need to think and do. Instilling obedience in followers by threatening torture and death in a “hell” for “sinning”, oppressing women to the point they’re considered no better than livestock, and commanding people to fear the same character they’re told to love are just a few things straight out of holy books. The definition of sado-masochism. These are things set out in holy books very clearly. I think we need to be stricter about what can be taught from religion. Holy books should never be taken literally, and unfortunately there are too many who do just that. To me, they need to be taken as the works of literature and fiction they are. 

None of the “big religions” can say it doesn’t teach this and I’m disgusted to read the quotes from various religious leaders already saying that the people in Pulse had it coming for being gay. It’s amazing the audacity people have when they think they have god on their side.
I’m steadily losing any sort of faith in humanity’s ability to sort through the nonsense of their religions and live like they claim their religions teach them – to love and to give and to be tolerant. Clearly, not enough of that is coming through.

I know people are going to get pretty upset at my sentiments because, to many, religion is their favourite toy, their favourite crutch, or their favourite source for morality. And it must be hard to hear that it isn’t perfect. Unfortunately, morality within religion is really hard to find and if we can’t learn to see past the disgusting things that many religions teach and encourage, heartbreaking events like this shooting in Orlando are going to keep happening.

If you remove the motivation and promised glory many killers receive from religion, perhaps so many people would not have to die. If you ask me, there is no such thing as a religion of peace. Just religions of fear and bigotry and misogyny and prejudice and violence. Until the killing and misery stemming from extreme or radical religious belief stops, that opinion will not change. I don’t care how many charitable acts any religion boasts about, this does not undo nor does it forgive any misery or suffering caused by its teachings.
-Jenn

Psychology Behind Public Disdain For Science

Ever wonder why people don’t seem to trust things like scientific evidence? Facts? Consensus?

I have, especially when it comes to things like vaccines, medicine, and the rest of the world around us it seems.  I stumbled upon a very interesting little tidbit packed so full of cool info, you’ll need a brain massage.  It tries to make sense of why people tend to believe themselves correct even though they aren’t really qualified to do so.

While psychology has always been a topic that fascinated me, I admit I am no expert on the field.  I found this very interesting, and I daresay helped me find a new perspective.

Give this a read!  Let me know what you think!

http://theness.com/neurologicablog/index.php/the-gap-between-public-and-scientific-opinion/

Rant in Response to The Honest Liar’s “Homeopathy: Money for Nothing”

Today was just that sort of day where A) I had the energy to get enraged enough to rant and write and B) I happened to find an easy target.  Homeopathy.

Fair? No.

Do I feel better? A little bit.

Here goes.

Here’s the clip which inspired such a passionate response:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E-FwdACE2ZY&feature=youtu.be
Soooo you’re buying a bottle of diluted nothing for big money, but the guys who spend millions researching actual medicines (which actually work) are the crooks? Right.

If homeopathy is your way, I would suggest you let go of your delusions and placebos and replace it with PROVEN, science based medicine rather than trying to buy into an ancient crock of you-know-what. How can I say it’s a crock? I can say that with confidence due to the utter lack of proof when it comes to these “treatments” having any efficacy at all. Treating with nothing does exactly that – NOTHING. And that is precisely what homeopathy is – a whole bottle full of nothing. I know, modern medicines are awful! They treat things and make people feel better and stuff… Let’s go the “all natural” way and treat things like they used to in the bronze age. Here’s a little fact – there’s a reason people only lived into their 30’s back then and I think you can guess what that reason is.

I don’t know when the idea came about that science and medicine are awful things. Wanna know what’s awful? Disease. And worse yet – watching a loved one die of said disease. But somehow the guys doing all of the research into life-saving and life-improving medicine are the guys that you need to flip the proverbial bird to because they’re the evil ones?

How about the scam artists pretending to be doctors, selling you “medicines” that actually aren’t medicines at all? Those guys will charge you an arm and a leg for a product diluted to the point of having no trace of the original (ineffective) ingredient, but the PHARMA companies are the scam artists?

Seems legit.

Nobody’s perfect but the ones who claim to be so are the worst.

10 Reasons Why I’m Not a Christian

I fully support and believe in each of these points. Thanks hessianwithteeth!

hessianwithteeth

*Since it appears a lot of people can’t read, the title says 10 Reasons Why I’m Not A Christian, not 10 Reasons Why Christianity Is Wrong. Please take this into consideration before responding.*

1) A creator is not required for the universe to exist as it is.
We have decades of scientific research that shows how the universe could have come about, and we have evidence that shows that it likely came about in that manner. Scientists go through years of schooling in order to learn both what has been learned in the past and how to perform studies in order to advance our understanding. Science has given us the computers we use to blog, the medicine that has extended our lives greatly, and any number of other things we take for granted. But they have also advanced our understanding of the world we live in. Religion, however, my offer…

View original post 1,053 more words

National Vet Tech Week

IMG_3939.JPG

Regardless of my current level of satisfaction at my job, I have to say the pride I feel in being an RVT never fades. I love the industry I work in, the camaraderie felt with the other techs as well as support staff and doctors, and the constant challenge that each day brings.

Some of the jobs that fall under my job description aren’t pretty, aren’t desirable, and quite often don’t smell very good. However, no matter what, I know that all the little things that I do will contribute to the betterment of the pet’s life. It does become tedious when you are trying to teach someone how to help their pet and they’re clearly going to dismiss everything you’ve said as soon as they walk out the door, provided they actually listened in the first place. I’ve written previously about the things that irk me as a veterinary professional and those things continue to happen day in and day out. What keeps me in this field is the group of like-minded individuals I get to work with on a daily basis.

Even though many of us are in different stages of lives, we have a common goal of helping animals that bring us together at work.  Through thick and thin we keep a positive attitude, which is so essential in avoiding burnout and compassion fatigue.  Lately in the veterinary world, the number of people succumbing to these things is on the rise and thankfully our clinic has taken this quite seriously.  We are all attending a workshop on mental health next week, and I can’t be more proud that our clinic’s partners are taking such a proactive role in addressing the issue of mental health.  It’s not something a lot of people think of when it comes to our job, but it is very real and it does affect people in a big way.

As much as I may complain about the job of a vet tech sometimes, we do find time to have fun and see the humour in everyday situations.  We can laugh about the tough things from yesterday or about an entertaining animal or client who is booked in today.  We can compare stories or “battle wounds” and make light of the fact that our job can really suck.  Despite that we love it because we are doing what we love, and we should count ourselves lucky as there are many people out there who either don’t love their job or have no idea what they even want to do.  We’ve found what makes us happy.

I certainly feel appreciated during National Vet Tech Week as our clinic owners took the time to show us their appreciation with sweet tweets, and even a little gift.  This really shows us that we are valued members of the team and that our work doesn’t go unnoticed.

From: blogs.oregonstate.edu

From this tech to all the others: KEEP IT UP!  Your efforts and hard work are what keep your clinic functioning, and just know that what you do matters.  Every day you contribute so much to the betterment of the lives of animals and their people, and you should be proud.

Overweight Cats & Why Owners Should Stop Being Offended

Owners of overweight cats need to hear this, and hear it without any type of sugar coating or euphemisms.  When I tell you your cat is overweight, it’s because your cat is overweight.  I’m not calling you fat, I am not picking on you, and I am not saying you are a bad person.

I can’t stress this enough – it’s not about you.  When I make a recommendation for your cat to lose weight, it is only because of the high number of risks associated with overweight cats, much the same as for a human.  It’s also because your cat is far too heavy.

People hear these risks so often that I think they’ve become desensitized to it, and therefore complacent when it comes to actually changing it.  Even if it may not be something that you take into account for your own daily life, at least do your cat the courtesy of helping them. They depend solely on you for it. A cat doesn’t understand the risks and complications of obesity so it is up to you as their sole caregiver to help them lead a happier, healthier life.

From: http://charlotte-harris.net

How can you tell if your cat is overweight?  Look at his head.  If it looks tiny in proportion to his body, your cat is too fat.  If your cat is over seven kilograms (ish), chances are they are overweight.  If your cat can’t lick it’s own ass, it’s too fat.   If any of these things apply, you need to take a good look at the way you’re feeding.  What may seem like a miniscule amount of food to us can actually be a normal meal for your feline.

It seems that people think that treats and a buffet of food is the key to keeping a kitty healthy and happy.  Oh look how cute he is, meowing because he wants more food.  Oh look, I’m feeling sad so I am going to get some love from my cat by feeding it some more treats.  This is not OK.  If you do these things even though it is making your cat rotund, then you should re-think being a cat owner.

You are not making their lives better by giving them all of the food and treats they want – you are contributing to a poor quality of life.  You are shortening that life, and making what they have left of it more and more uncomfortable with each pound they gain.  Outward signs that your cat may be uncomfortable or feeling effects of obesity are:

  • Panting (this is NOT normal for a cat and indicates distress)
  • Unwillingness to climb or jump
  • Inability to groom properly causing scalding around hind end
  • Itchy, scaly skin
  • Exercise intolerance
  • Inappropriate urination

By inappropriate urination, I mean urinating or defecating outside of the litterbox.  Maybe he just can’t fit, or maybe he’s trying to tell you something.  A common misconception I hear of on a constant basis is that urinating outside the litter box happens because the cat is unhappy with you, the owner.  This is silly and you need to stop thinking this way.  While it may seem like they have the capacity for vindication sometimes, this is false.  Inappropriate urination is understood to be a behaviour indicative of stress or urinary tract disease.  Don’t believe me? Here’s a University who has also said it:

http://www.vet.cornell.edu/fhc/health_resources/brochure_housesoiling.cfm

Something in your cat’s world, be it a new person, thing, or even renovations, can trigger these behaviours and getting to the bottom of which one it is can help.  It is heartbreaking to see cats being brought in for euthanasia for something like this because the majority of cases can be helped with a little guidance from the vet and effort from the owner.  If you have a situation like this, please ask your veterinarian for information first.

http://www.petobesityprevention.org

People need to realize that what you may think is a good weight for cats is actually much too high.  It seems like it has become a social norm to have a chunky cat at home.  If your cat doesn’t have a defined waist or it takes more than a light touch to feel ribs – your cat is too fat.  Here’s a little comparison to help this sink in – 1 pound gained on a cat is like 15 pounds on an average adult woman.  Click here for the full chart.

Injecting your cat after every meal probably doesn’t sound like your idea of a good time, does it?  Approximately 0.5% of cats will develop the disease due to obesity. This puts the numbers IN THE MILLIONS.  I don’t think it’s fair to these animals to feed them the way people do.  Let’s face it, there’s probably a solution and the onus needs to be put back on the owner to seek it out and make change.  Your cat is not mad at you, not getting back at you because you left, your cat is stressed.  It is your job to help.

Here’s more information on feline diabetes: http://www.vet.cornell.edu/FHC/health_resources/brochure_diabetes.cfm

See the bottom of this post for websites with statistics.

From: http://blog.petflow.com

http://www.canadianveterinarians.net/

http://www.petobesityprevention.org/

 

Feel free to shoot me an email with questions.

How much does it cost just to walk through the door of your vet’s office?

Growth Factors

Imagine you bring your pet to your primary care veterinarian because s/he’s recently shown some abnormal signs. Your veterinarian examines your pet, performs some few basic diagnostic tests, and suddenly, you find yourself on the receiving end of unimaginable news. Your veterinarian tells you your pet has cancer.

What do you do? Where do you turn for more information? How can you determine what your plan of action should be?

Your veterinarian recommends you schedule an appointment with a veterinary oncologist as your next step. You accept the referral and call to set up an appointment.

When you contact the specialists’ office, you are transferred to a scheduling coordinator who informs you of the doctor’s next available appointment. They explain what to expect during the time you’ll spend at the hospital. Lastly, they inform you of the consultation fee.

The price of the appointment may seem shocking to many owners…

View original post 708 more words

An everyday hard-worker with a penchant for offensive opinions and no patience for fluff. Believer in everything real.

%d bloggers like this: