Tag Archives: death

An Angry Rant About Religious Extremism and Those Who Condone Acts of Hateful Violence

If you are someone who’s easily offended when religion is criticized, please keep scrolling. I don’t need to hear religious apologists at this point. I’m so riled about these attacks against innocent people that I’ve decided to remove my usually firmly placed filter. If you plan to comment with non-productive insults, save your breath because I will delete it. I don’t have the time or the patience for people who cannot bear to see their god criticized. It’s probably best to just delete me if you cannot have a civil conversation about it. I won’t miss you. This is my way of getting things “off my chest” and there’s nothing I love more than open and honest dialogue. Please feel free to leave a comment with your thoughts.

Religious extremism + easy access to weapons = death. It’s that simple. Terror can come from anywhere – radicalists born in North America are just as dangerous as people from anywhere else when they’re convinced religious ideals need to be enforced with violence. 

The concept inspired by Hitchens is one I think should be followed. Religion should be treated like childrens’ toys – play with them at home with people who also want to play with the toys. Dont tell anyone else they have to play with the toys, don’t force the toys into government or schools, and most of all don’t use your toys to cause misery, death, and destruction. I’m not saying people don’t have the right to believe whatever they choose, I’m saying that once it starts to negatively impact other people’s lives, then you’ve taken it too far.

To say religion is the compass for morality is a joke. It takes ten seconds to come up with quotes from any holy book that promote violence, hate, fear, oppression, and death. We need to rid ourselves of these archaic and destructive “morals” before more innocent people die. 

While on the surface there are some good things that religion preaches, this doesn’t excuse the many terrible things it tells people they need to think and do. Instilling obedience in followers by threatening torture and death in a “hell” for “sinning”, oppressing women to the point they’re considered no better than livestock, and commanding people to fear the same character they’re told to love are just a few things straight out of holy books. The definition of sado-masochism. These are things set out in holy books very clearly. I think we need to be stricter about what can be taught from religion. Holy books should never be taken literally, and unfortunately there are too many who do just that. To me, they need to be taken as the works of literature and fiction they are. 

None of the “big religions” can say it doesn’t teach this and I’m disgusted to read the quotes from various religious leaders already saying that the people in Pulse had it coming for being gay. It’s amazing the audacity people have when they think they have god on their side.
I’m steadily losing any sort of faith in humanity’s ability to sort through the nonsense of their religions and live like they claim their religions teach them – to love and to give and to be tolerant. Clearly, not enough of that is coming through.

I know people are going to get pretty upset at my sentiments because, to many, religion is their favourite toy, their favourite crutch, or their favourite source for morality. And it must be hard to hear that it isn’t perfect. Unfortunately, morality within religion is really hard to find and if we can’t learn to see past the disgusting things that many religions teach and encourage, heartbreaking events like this shooting in Orlando are going to keep happening.

If you remove the motivation and promised glory many killers receive from religion, perhaps so many people would not have to die. If you ask me, there is no such thing as a religion of peace. Just religions of fear and bigotry and misogyny and prejudice and violence. Until the killing and misery stemming from extreme or radical religious belief stops, that opinion will not change. I don’t care how many charitable acts any religion boasts about, this does not undo nor does it forgive any misery or suffering caused by its teachings.
-Jenn

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Loss

Recently, in the busyness that is my life, I have come across an experience completely new to me.  It was one that I had hoped would never come to pass and that I had been dreading for months.

On Monday, September the 8th, I euthanized my family dog.  My first puppy.  My playmate as a kid and comforting presence as a teenager.  She used to make sure I was up in time for work in the morning, although I don’t think her motives were entirely pure.  I still believe that she only did it to get me out of my warm, cozy bed so that she could climb in and bask in the comfiness.

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She was born sometime in November, 1997.  For a dog of her size, she was well into her geriatric years.  There were many things that influenced our decision to finally lay her to rest, but one big one was her inability to do the things she loved.  Chasing balls, chasing really anything that moved including one rabbit in particular who she never did catch…  This would leave her stiff and sore and probably regretting her brief lapse into puppy-hood.

I still vividly remember the day she came home with my dad, an early Christmas present.  His timed reveal was thrown off because just as he was lecturing us on having to be good for the next twenty years, she popped out of his jacket and surveyed her new surroundings.  Her name was Smooch, after running up to my dad and kissing him thoroughly when he went to pick her out as a puppy.

As she got older and sorer, she no longer beat me up the stairs as she always did.  I would often slow down and let her get by me as she hurried slower and slower with each passing year, just because I knew it made her day.  She always had to be in view or with her family, and scouting the upstairs first was at the top of her priority list.

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I will miss the way she would do laps around the ground floor, so rambunctious in her excitement that someone had come home.  Even though she would still do this from time to time as she aged, the laps got slower and the corners eventually too tight for her to make in time without making a little bobble here and there.

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The decision is so final that I had a hard time coming to terms with making it.  Even though I knew, in both my professional mind and my emotional one, that I was making the right decision, I still felt like second-guessing myself.  When my family finally came to me and inquired about the process, I knew that there was no more avoiding it.  As my first dog, I had a hard time letting go.

Now, I have grieved and I have even felt a glimmer of relief that her life will no longer be uncomfortable or painful.  She will no longer wander as if she were lost, or groan as she got up from a nap.  I will no longer lose sleep thinking about whether or not she is in pain, or lonely, or confused.  I know that she lived a happy life full of memories, loving people, snacks she wasn’t supposed to have and tennis balls.  One full of bonfires where she would herd the guests and their vehicles into their parking spaces, and mooch food from the gullible ones.  She was so good at that, and rightfully earned her nickname, “Mooch”.

While in college for veterinary technology, I came across a poem that I knew immediately would one day be the one I used to console myself following Smooch’s inevitable passing.  Let me first say that I am not one for poetry, nor have I ever been, but this was a piece that was undeniably suitable and has brought me some small consolation following this loss.  It still brings a little tear to my eye to read it.

Smooch was a good dog, the best really, and I will miss her as long as I have the capacity to feel loss.  Sometimes the most appropriate decisions are the hardest, but she did her job being an admirable, wonderful pet and I believe I owed it to her to do the right thing.

You will forever be loved and deeply missed.

Goodbye, my friend.

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