Common Pet Myths: Busted – Part 2

One can probably write as many parts on this as there are parts to the Fast and Furious movies, but I think it’s time to touch on a few more.

1. The term “neuter” applies only to male animals.

This is a fairly harmless one in my eyes but nevertheless it is misused by both professionals and clients. By definition, it can apply to the sterilization of both males and females but often it is only used to describe the castration of male animals, while we use the term “spay” for females. Or “spaded” as some folk who are one sandwich short of a picnic call it.  Often I am tempted to reply, “No, we don’t take them out back and beat them with shovels” but I fear it would be lost on some and slightly unprofessional.

2. Cats urinate on things because they’re mad at you.

This idea infuriates me a little bit, even though I can understand why it may be a valid theory to some. Often cats will urinate inappropriately due to stressors like something significant changing in their daily routine. New people, new things, new pets – these can all contribute. Cats can also be prone to stress cystitis, which essentially means a stressed cat with an angry bladder which makes the cat’s life very uncomfortable in the urinary department and yours very frustrating when you find wee little bits of urine around the house.

Please cut the cats some slack. Sometimes the issue of stress can be solved as easily as cleaning the litter box more often, adding another, or changing the style (ie lid vs no lid). Obviously you aren’t going to remove your new crying, screaming, attention-hogging little human from the home, but hopefully your cat will eventually come to realize that life can still go on with the addition of a baby to the family dynamic. Stay strong, there are ways to work around this and avenues that may help.

3. It can be “normal” for your cat or dog (usually cats) to vomit on a regular basis.

Do YOU feel nauseated and/or vomit on a regular basis if you are healthy?  Would YOU think this is normal if it happened to you? What makes you think that vomiting every day is normal for your cat, then?  Yes, they do it all the time.  No, this does not mean it is “normal”, it means it is “frequent” and that sucks for your cat.  I don’t think you would enjoy it, and I bet your cat doesn’t either.  There are myriad reasons why your cat may throw up.  Excessive grooming, stress, kidney disease, liver disease, toxicity, plus many other things. I think it is worth a trip to your vet to see if one of these issues is happening and perhaps you’ll be able to halt something serious before it progresses.

4.  Lastly, but certainly not least,  is one that I have become quite passionate about this year especially with a local epidemic of parvo virus – VACCINATIONS.

I am quite passionate about my pro-vaccine stance and it’s Monday, so I have absolutely no patience for unfounded claims and other such silliness. Let me start by describing to you what a day in the life of a dog with CPV (canine parvo virus) is like.  They’re put in isolation due to the fact that CPV is incredibly contagious, they vomit and defecate bloody, liquid material which has a smell like a mixture of skunk, digested blood, and death.  Too often they die from dehydration or lack of nutrition.

The disease causes the villi of the intestine to become disabled, making it impossible for the dog to absorb any kind of nutrients.  It’s important to note that there is no cure, so just like a human cold, only supportive treatments are available to help the body fight off the virus and stay hydrated.  Antibiotics and fluids will do their part, but the animal’s immune system must fight it off in order for the pet to recover.  What’s particularly heartbreaking is that this disease targets primarily puppies, whose immune systems aren’t always quite developed enough to fight this disease properly.

This can be prevented as easily as a needle under the skin.  A vaccine.  Lately there are many people trying to tell us that vaccines are bad, they’re just moneymakers, they cause autism, etc.  Let me ask you this – when is the last time you saw an autistic dog? Right. Give it a rest.  CPV is a serious, deadly disease that can live in almost any environment (anywhere) for five months (see: http://ow.ly/Acrnn). Many disinfectants aren’t enough to kill CPV except bleach, therefore it is very difficult to get rid of.  Dogs pick it up by ingesting the virus from the environment, like where an infected dog has defecated.  Then they quite literally defecate and puke their life away.  Parvo poop is a smell you won’t soon forget.

I will stick to vaccines in pets because that is where most of my knowledge lies, but I am slowly learning about the human side of it.  From what I have read and what I can tell, preventing fatal disease epidemics will outweigh most other risks in my eyes.  When did Hollywood attention-seekers become a better source for scientific information than actual science?  Oh, and since when did a disability like autism become worse than death?

From: http://www.scienceblogs.com (Couldn’t help myself)

Vaccinating your pet regularly can help prevent disease not only in your one pet, but any pet that yours comes in contact with.  It doesn’t take much for a disease to spread, but if your pet is vaccinated that is one less that will carry it and pass it on.  Sometimes people will say to me, “We haven’t seen “x” disease in years, why are we still vaccinating for it?”.  The answer is simple.  We don’t see it because we vaccinate for it.  It still lives in the wildlife population, so if you were to stop vaccinating it would become a problem all over again.

I’ve seen this type of person many times.  It is when their pet dies from a preventable disease that all of a sudden the proverbial light bulb flashes on and they’re right in to get their next pet vaccinated.  It’s a shame that it often happens this way, but it is the reality of it.  Clinics in Ontario see multiple cases every year (don’t worry, I’ve asked many people in the veterinary field in Ontario).  Currently Cornwall, Ontario is in the midst of an outbreak. There are larger clinics in the US that have seen 5, 10, and in some clinics even upwards of 50 cases this year alone. It’s out there, and it is very real. Please get your puppy vaccinated.

Here is the CTV news video: http://ow.ly/AcDLZ

From: http://www.modularhomecoach.com/

I plan to write more extensively on vaccines at another time, once I have gathered more hard evidence to show you.  If there is a particular vaccine or disease you’d like me to touch on, by all means leave me a comment or send me an email with the form at the bottom of the page.

If you don’t mind, perhaps you can help me gauge the opinion of people reading this blog:

Here is a link with more information as well: http://www.phac-aspc.gc.ca/lab-bio/res/psds-ftss/parvovirus-eng.php

 

 

 

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